What do we know about the history of tourism?
What do we know about the history of tourism?

What do we know about the history of tourism?

Tourism can be for education, health, walking, religion, sports, winter, eco, hunting, and research, etc.

The meaning of tourism is the idea that people go from one place to another for certain purposes and definitely return.

This means that tourism can be for education, health, walking, religion, sports, winter, eco, hunting, and research, etc. Today, we can extend this list. The first such movement originated in the 12th century for the sole purpose of religious pilgrimage.

Over time, this became more widespread, uniting East and West. From the 14th century onwards, along with religious pilgrimages, for educational purposes. Also, people start from one country to another this has mostly happened between England and Italy.

The origin and development of modern tourism can be traced back to the brothers James, and Thomas Cook. Although James Cook is remembered for his world tours. Thomas Cook worked to organize people's walks. The Cook brothers went down in history as the founders of the first travel company. On July 5, 1841, Thomas Cook gathered 570 people for the first time and took them on the first tourist trip by rail. The trip brought the Cook family great popularity in the UK, and he further developed his business and became a global player.

The development of tourism grew in 1845 and stretched from London to Liverpool. Today, the EXPO is known to everyone. It was the first EXPO. At the initiative of the Cook brothers, it took place in London in 1851 and was attended by 165,000 people. The second EXPO took place in 1855 in France.

The world's first travel agency (Travel agency TOMAS COOK & SON) was officially registered in 1851. The "Everything is included" system, which is sought after by people who love to travel, dates back to 1855. People continued to travel comfortably with a one-time payment. It is connected with the usual Thomas Cook's first big sea voyage in the world. Well-known writer Mark Twain also took part in the walk, which he noted in his book The Innocents Abroad.